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wolfgang hutter

︎Artist, Painting, Spirituality   
︎ Ventral Is Golden


How do you describe the interior of a weapons facility in Soviet Siberia without ever having been there? Can you decipher the news by reading the freckles on a chicken's egg? What is a long, tiresome speech delivered by a frothy pie topping?

There are a lot of questions in the world, and these are just three of them. But what impact do they have, if any, upon our psychological make-up, in a society that seems ever closer to a technological singularity. What even is a technological singularity?






In its most basic description, a technological singularity is a point in time when the capacity of artificial intelligence reaches an exponential growth so rapid that it surpasses all human intelligence. Terrence McKenna also spoke about singularity as an era of compressionism, where history would undergo the same rapid change brought about by the speed of technological change. One example of this is the idea that a child in Africa with a smartphone has more intelligent access to knowledge than the President of the United States had 20 years ago. So it would follow, reasonably, that as access to information increases, that same information also undergoes alterations more rapidly. 

This phenomena of information change is present in the very article  you are reading now. As an individual from a mining town in the north of England, the very thought of me trying to articulate meaningful information about a Fantastic Realist painter from Austria, in an era before I existed, for an audience I'll largely never interact with except through a series of severs, seems incredibly absurd to me. Nevertheless, it appears to be true, and the geography, time and space of where content is located is now not as essential as it once was. Meaning it can move and change more quickly.

As information is disseminated with more ease, new perspectives start to emerge through the limitations of the old ideals.
Examples of this can be seen in how some other artists reappropriate information. Such as Niki de Saint Phalle, for her study of the esoteric tarot designs, reimagined through her deeply felt persecution of the feminine, or Neo-tantrism, which combines western abstraction with Hindu and Buddhist spiritual practices.

With each technological development, there is a consciousness shift within the society. Whether the technology is a hallucinogenic plant or a microchip, the effect is to have our knowledge extend beyond its previous limitations.


So keeping this in mind, how do you describe the interior of a weapons facility in Soviet Siberia without ever having been there? Can you decipher the news by reading the freckles on a chicken's egg? What is a long, tiresome speech delivered by a frothy pie topping, and what exactly has it got to do with technological singularity and esoteric folk art?





In his novel, 'No Word From Gerb', Edourado Mendoza explores the social structures of Barcelona as the city prepares for the 1992 Olympic Games. The protagonist is an alien who lands on earth in search of his missing friend Gerb. The alien critiques the strange customs of humans, and in one case suggests that newspapers are a less reliable source of gaining information about the world than reading the freckles on an egg shell. With the precise technology of being able to understand the position of the freckles, the alien can derive all the relevant, unbiased information that he needs.


Although written as tongue-in-cheek science fiction satire, it nevertheless provides us with the mental tools to analyse the pattern structures of media, even more so now those structures are increasingly governed by algorithms. Arguably, this could be the same phenomena that helped rebrand propaganda as ‘fake news’. An attempt perhaps to centralise information once again, that dominated so much public opinion in the age of the printing press.




“The alien critiques the strange customs of humans, and in one case suggests that newspapers are a less reliable source of gaining information about the world than reading the freckles on an egg shell.“




Remote Viewing is a technique of ESP (Extra Sensory Perception) normally associated with New Age spiritual techniques of telepathy. Ironically, these views in the West have been ridiculed since the 1960's for lack of scientific rigour, but now find themselves at the forefront of technological developments and scientific discussion.
Two proponents of which are Ray Kurzweil (Head of Engineering at Google) and Russell Targ (A Laser Physicist from the Stanford Research Institute who worked for the CIA for approximately 25 years).

Russell Targ stated that he became interested in Physics as an amateur magician, and it was during this time he acknowledged the potential of a spiritual, scientific approach, and what material applications this could have for the evolution of a society.


The following excerpt from the Washington Post, dated 1984, describes some of the military and social applications of ESP:

"Parapsychology is a field so full of pseudo-scientists, flakes and outright charlatans, that it's easy to debunk the whole idea. But, there are legitimate laboratory projects that may eventually unlock the mysteries of the human mind. One of the most promising is the testing of "remote viewing" — the claimed ability of some psychics to describe scenes thousands of miles away.
The CIA and the Pentagon have an obvious interest in this phenomenon. If they could get psychics to throw their minds behind the Iron Curtain there'd be no need to risk the lives of human agents. The CIA sent representatives to a parapsychology conference in Virginia last December. Besides the usual spoon bending — which professional magicians have debunked as a fairly simple trick — there was serious discussion of remote viewing. In fact; the CIA is now seriously pondering the possibility of raising "psychic shields" to keep Soviet remote viewers away from our secrets."



“Ironically, views on Extra Sensory Percpetion in the West have been ridiculed since the 1960's for lack of scientific rigour, but now find themselves at the forefront of technological developments and scientific discussion.”



Spoon bending and conspiracy theories aside, there is a general roll of the eyes when you talk about these kinds of things. With the attribution of childlike thinking and an unscientific mind, these ideas are easily cast aside. But the most telling things about these reactions are that they can be disseminated across the globe in seconds, at the speed of light, using electricity and minerals such as Tantalum and Coltan, that are the very stuff conspiracy theories seem to be made of.


Once again, Hutter's art work seem to have that visionary quality that so much of traditional Folk Art has running through it's entire culture and way of life. They are not fanciful ideas, but instead both a critique and a blueprint of how consciousness originated and where society, as a creation of consciousness, is going.

If ancient Buddhist philosophy of non-duality and a single consciousness are re-emerging through the effects of our technologies, we can be forgiven for thinking that history is repeating itself. Although time seems circular, it is an exponentially increasing circle, containing more space but lacking nothing (as the Taoist philosophy goes). Within this space, ancient approaches or understanding of technological capabilities are being rediscovered.

Finally, what is a long, tiresome speech delivered by a frothy pie topping? The answer was successfully given by Watson, IBM's Question-Answering Computer as part of the american quiz show Jeopardy. The two human contestants of the show answered incorrectly.






Mark